• I Had a Black Dog: His Name was Depression

    Anxiety and Depression - Young People

    There are many different breeds of Black Dog affecting millions of people from all walks of life. The Black Dog is an equal opportunity mongrel. It was Winston Churchill who popularized the phrase Black Dog to describe the bouts of depression he experienced for much of his life. Matthew Johnstone, a sufferer himself, has written and illustrated this moving and uplifting insight into what it is like to have a Black Dog as a companion and how he learned to tame it and bring it to heel.

  • My Anxious Mind: A teens guide to managing anxiety and panic

    Anxiety and Depression - Young People

    This book is for adolescents who find that their anxiety, shyness or worrying thoughts are getting in the way of them making friends, asking for help, or doing the things they want to do. Teens are guided through recognising their anxiety, accessing help and support, as well as being provided with tools and exercises which may help them manage anxiety with a wellness plan. While this book specifies a target audience age of 12 to 18, the nature of some topics (a young person’s anxiety, triggers, coping mechanisms) means it may be more suitable to be read with a trusted adult or mental health professional for those aged 12 to 15. For older teens reading this book alone, it would be useful for them to be engaged with a mentor so they have support to work through issues that are brought up for them.

     

    This book provides a myriad of strategies and resources for a teen to work through and implement in their daily life. It is readable with a good mix of narrative with exercises and illustrations. It would likely be most effective for teens with good literacy levels who are motivated and also have support from a trusted adult or appropriate clinician. However, the tone of this book conveys that if they work hard enough they can manage their anxiety which could be damaging for some teens – recognising that anxiety occurs in the context of a teen’s whole life and there are things that they cannot control.

  • Quiet the Mind

    Books

    An Illustrated Guide on How to Meditate.

    In a world where finding even ten minutes to ‘do nothing’, the benefits of meditation can be profound. Meditation is simply a way of giving our brains a well-deserved break and can actually help our brains to function healthy and happily. This beautifully illustrated guide is an inspiring and practical book which shows you how to meditate without the need for uncomfortable lotus positions or prayer beads! With his typical gentle and insightful humour, Matthew’s guide to meditation will enable to you to feel more present, more youthful, have more energy and greater concentration, improve your mood and sleep more soundly.

  • The Shyness and Social Anxiety Workbook for Teens

    Anxiety and Depression - Young People

    An easy to read and follow book with step-by-step activities and education about how social anxiety develops, how it affects teenagers and how to overcome this. Many young people struggle with fears and worries about how they are perceived or judged by others, responding by avoiding social situations that increase their social anxiety. This book helps teens recognise they are not alone in their struggles, discover links between their thoughts, feelings and actions and assists them to challenge fears and overcome anxiety. Most pages include clever, fun animations or cartoon-style illustrations of the concepts being explained.

     

    Information is easy to understand and worksheets require teens to consider their own situation and clear effective strategies to develop skills needed to overcome social anxiety. This is a self-help book using evidence-based CBT and ACT, but can also be used as a workbook by mental health clinicians. Brief information on when to seek professional help is also included.

     

  • The Stress Reduction Workbook for Teens

    Books

    Mindfulness Skills to Help you Deal with Stress

    First, the bad news: your teenage years are some of the most stressful of your life. Up to 70 percent of teens say they’re stressed out, and with pressure about grades at school, parents who just don’t seem to get it, and friends who drive you crazy, it’s no wonder. Here’s the good news! If you learn a few strategies for getting stress under control now, you’ll have the skills you need to deal with problems and difficult feelings that life sends your way in high school and beyond.

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